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STATE TREASURES

Treasure Hunter's Secret Manual

SUBMITTED STORIES FROM VARIOUS AUTHORS

ALABAMA

  1. Morris Slater, alias Railroad Bill, was a train robber in the 1890s in S.W. Alabama.  None of the loot he acquired over his 6 years of banditry was ever recovered.    Many believe the cash was buried, possibly in a cave.  The only clue he left behind, before he was gunned down at Atmore in 1896, was that he never strayed far from the railroad tracks between Atmore and Bay Minette.
  2. From 1815-1864, Henry Nunez operated a very profitable ferry on Perdido River, about where Hwy 90 now crosses the river, about 16 miles N.W. of Pensacola, FL on the Alabama side.   He died around 1866 and it was believed by area residents that over $100,000 in gold and silver coins was never recovered.  The hoard is presumed to be in several different caches and buried somewhere near the ferry landing or the ruins of his old house.
  3. In December of 1864 word was received by townsfolk that Col. Joseph Sanders was on his way to Newton with his horde of deserters, escaped slaves and common outlaws to attack the town.  Plans to defend the town were quickly completed and a box filled with gold coins in the courthouse was buried by 3 men somewhere nearby.  After the attack was over, the 3 men who hid the box were dead and the location of the cache died with them.  It was never recovered.
  4. The McGillivray Plantation ruins can be found 4 miles N. of Wetumpka.  Built around 1750, it was destroyed during an Indian attack sometime later.  There are legends that a hoard of coins and silver tableware remains buried or hidden on the property.
  5. cache of gold coins and bars worth an estimated $900,000 is believed buried somewhere in the area of Birmingham.  The treasure was destined for the Confederate Treasury in Richmond, VA in 1862, but never reached its destination.  The precise location and other details of this cache are not available.
  6. In 1897, C.E. Sharps purchased the old White's Mill, 6 miles NW of Florence and accumulated a vast fortune in gold coins.  He is known to have buried a large quantity of money somewhere in the woods south of the mill among the trees before he died in an accident in 1899.
  7. Two wooden crates, each 2'x3'x4' and filled with a large amount of gold and silver coins said to total $100,000 and destined for the Confederate forces at Columbia, Tennessee, were buried when Union forces approached as the wagon transporting the huge treasure became mired in a bog-hole near Athens.  The cache was made at an 1865-era stream crossing about 4 miles N of Athens and about 1/2 mile W of the crossing.

  8. In the 1830s, when the Cherokee Indians were forced to leave their lands and move to Oklahoma, a pot of gold was buried on the old Shelby Cullom farm, 2 miles N of Ryland in a section called Bellfaun which borders the Flint River.
  9. $30,000 in gold coins, known as the Hickson Treasure, is buried in the Bridgeport area.
  10. In the early 1800s, Levi Colbert lived in a house near the ferry he operated on the Tennessee River which became known as " Buzzard Roost".  It is located in Colbert County, just off the Natchez Trace Parkway, the second exit after crossing the Tennessee River heading south.  A considerable amount of gold & silver coins is buried in the woods East of the house. 
  11. John Willsmith owned nearly half the town of Fort Payne in the late 1800's. After his death in 1898, searchers were made to find the $100,000 in gold he was known to have accumulated, but all failed. It is believed to remain buried on one of many pieces of property Willsmith owned in the area.
  12. In the 1800's the outlaw Jesse James used the area of Dawson for a hideout,
     located on Sand Mountain not far from Collinsville. There are those who speculated  that he cached some of his outlaw treasure somewhere in the area that never was  recovered.
  13. In 1845, Hardy Clemens was a wealthy plantation and slave owner who owned a
     huge farm near Coaling on the banks of Big Sandy Creek, about 12 miles E of  Tuscaloosa. When the Civil War reached Alabama, he buried about $100,000 in gold  somewhere on his property. Rumors have escalated that the huge cache is buried:
          A) Under his house.
          B) Around the cotton gin near the spring.
          C) In the area of his hog farm.
          D) In the cemetery of his slaves.
          Clements died in 1863 without revealing the exact location of his treasure, which still awaits recovery to this day.
  14. The Spring Treasure, a cache of gold and silver coins, is reportedly buried near Talladega.
  15. Around 1832, Indians had a secret source of silver somewhere near their village
    which was located near Ironaton. The location was believed to be to the NW of the village in the area of Wolf Creek. When the tribe was forced to a reservation in  Arkansas, they took with them only a small portion of the silver they had mined.
    The larger portion is believed to have been buried in or near the mine.
  16. A large Indian treasure is buried on top of Talladega Mountain in an abandoned
     mine shaft. The cache has never been recovered.
  17. In 1903, an Indian came to Roanoke from Oklahoma and inquired about some old
      mulberry trees in the area. Old residents told him where one was located, but the  others had been cut down. Near the standing tree, the Indian dug up a large
     number of Indian relics but his deerskin waybill was useless for the other caches,  believed to contain vast quanities of gold Indian treasure.
  18. GT: Tannehill, was once a major pig-iron region in the South, now a state park.
     The town was destroyed during the Civil War. There are numerous legends that
     tell of hidden treasure being cached at Tannchill.
  19. The McGillivray Plantation ruins can be found 4 miles N of Wetumpka. Built
     around 1750, it was destroyed during an Indian attack sometime later. There are
     legends that a hoard of gold coins and silver tableware remain buried or hidden
      on the property.
  20. The Horseshoe Bend Treasure, $200,000 in gold coins, is buried near Tallassee.
  21. During the Civil War, 3 wagonloads of gold and silver coins worth $285,000 were
     buried along a fence line near Tallassee in the central part of the state. The
     treasure has never been recovered.
  22. During the Civil War, C. Boaz Whitfield buried a large hoard of gold coins on his
     farm near Demopolis for safekeeping. The plantation was located 18 miles from
     Demopolis near Jefferson. He left information to this treasure among his papers,
      but after his death, the coins went unrecovered. In 1926, a descendant came across the papers and started a search on the Shady  Grove farm, looking for an old boundary stake. Using the information, he found a  hoard of $200,000 in $20 gold pieces dated 1850 or earlier which Boaz had buried  to prevent seizure by Union troops. There is speculation that additional cache  remain hidden on the property.
  23. The outlaw James Copeland buried a barrel of gold coins worth an estimated
     $350,000 near the Pirate Oak in Bayou La Batre. There are no reports of any
     recovery of this cache.
  24. The pirate Jean Lafitte is said to have buried $80,000 in gold coins on a beach in
      Bayou La Batre S of Mobile.
  25. The Gulf Coast pirate Gasparilla reportly buried several cheasts of pirate loot at
    various locations in Mobile Bay.
  26. Dauphin Island is located across the Mississppi Sound at the entrance of Mobile
     Bay. It was used by the Spanish, French and the British as an army base and
     Union troops were stationed here after the Civil War. It was also a haven for early-
     day pirates and outlaws as well. The island holds many legends of hidden treasure and is a relic hunter's paradise. 
  27. A large jeweled cross was dropped in a well on Dauphin island to prevent its
    being stolen by pirates and was never recovered. Tales and legends of buried  
     jars, pots and chests filled with treasure and savings are circulated quietly  
     among the residents of Dauphin Island that date back centuries. The island has
      never had a bank.
  28. An unidentified Spanish galleon, carrying an estimated $1 million in gold and
    silver treasure, was caught in a storm and wrecked on the E end of Dauphin
     Island in 1801. Only 11 crew members survived and told of the rich cargo that was
    lost. There was no salvage reported.

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