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STATE TREASURES

Treasure Hunter's Secret Manual

SUBMITTED STORIES FROM VARIOUS AUTHORS

ALASKA

  1. In 1892, $1 million face value of gold coins were buried on the island of Adak by illegal seal pirates.  The coins were placed in small food tin cans cached in numerous shallow deposits near the shoreline of the island.  Nearly all of the cans have yet to be recovered. 
  2. Two men robbed a riverboat steamer of $13,000 in gold dust and nuggets, contained in an iron box, around 1890.  Aboard the boat as passengers, they stole the chest from a locked room at night, tied a rope around the chest at one end and a life preserver at the other end.  Making careful notes of landmarks, they pushed the chest overboard in the river ( between Tanana and Kokrines ) where the Tanana River joins it.  They disembarked at the next rest stop and returned to the site, but could not find the chest.   Somehow the life preserver had come loose from the rope and the chest was lost in the river.  The men were later captured, but the chest of gold could not be found. 
  3. A young prospector, remembered only as "Frank", accumulated a great number of fruit jars full of gold dust and nuggets during the gold rush in the Klondike around 1897.  He took a dozen jars home with him on a trip to Welsh Hill, PA, but when he returned to the Klondike he mysteriously died.  His intentions had been to pick up the remaining fruit jars filled with gold and sell his claim near Dawson.  The jars must still be there. 
  4. A guard, on a steamboat carrying $40,000 in gold dust and nuggets, stole the sacks from the ship's strongroom in the 1890s and buried the gold ashore while the boat was tied up at the Fairbanks wharf.  He was found out, tried and sent to prison where he died without ever recovering the treasure. 
  5. Iditarod ( now a ghost town ), on the Iditarod River between the Yukon and Kuskowim Rivers, reached a peak population of 2,000 people during the Gold Rush and was widely known as a gambler's paradise.  Over  $18.5 million dollars was removed from area mines from 1910 to 1942.  Lots of caches are rumored to be hidden nearby.

  6. A cache of $50,000 in gold coins, known as the Tramp Stranger Treasure, is buried in the York area.
  7. The legendary Gold Rush of 1898 took place along Anvil Creek, 4 miles N of Nome. A tent city stretching for 15 miles along Nome Beach sprang up.  The number of ruins in this area are uncountable and is a paradise for relic and coin cache hunters.
  8. In 1884, three prospectors traveling across the St. Elias Mtns., near the Yukon River, came to a small lake where they found the bar literally covered with gold nuggets.  They stored over 1,000 lbs. in a nearby cave.  Indians killed two, one escaped & never returned for the gold.
  9. Many abandoned gold mines and miners cabins can be found S. of Anchorage along the Seward Hwy.
  10. 18 sacks of highgraded gold ore are cached in an abandoned mine shaft on the N side of the Harris River, about 3 miles from the mouth and tidewater of Twelvemile Arm.  The cache was secreted there in 1927.
  11. The legendary gold rush of 1898 took place along Anvil Creek, 4 miles N of Nome.  
    A tent-city stretching for 15 miles along Nome Beach sprang up and two years
    later, the entire peninsula was being worked. In 1899, the beaches yielded $10
    million in gold. Today, the beaches are still worked  by gold seekers.
    The number of ruins in this area are uncountable and is a paradise for relic and
     coin cache hunters.
  12. In 1884, three prospectors traveling across the St. Elias Mountains near Yukon
    River came to a small lake where they found the bar literally covered with gold
     nuggets. The first one they picked up weighed 10 pounds; another 50 pounds.
    They built a cabin and remained at the lake for weeks, picking up gold nuggets by
     the handful and storing them in a nearby cave. They estimated their accumulated
     hoard at 1/2 ton or more. A band of hostile Tlinget Indians struck, killing one of
     the miners and burned the cabin. The other two managed to escape and, after
    enduring unbelievable hardship, reached the states. One of the men became paralyzed and the other headed back to the site the following summer but wasnever heard from again. It is believed that he was killed by the Indians in his attempt to recover the gold. 
  13. Somewhere in the St. Elias Mountains near the Yellow River is a place called the Lake of the Golden Bar. Three prospectors found and worked the site for about 5years and in 1884, had accumulated 500 pounds of nuggets which was stored in a nearby cave. The men were trapped in a blinding blizzard and died. When their remains were later found, one prospector's diary mentioned the gold being buried, but the site was never found.

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