LOST TREASURE USA
THE TREASURE HUNTER'S NEWSLETTER
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Treasure Hunter's Secret Manual
 

LOST TREASURE USA

THE TREASURE HUNTER'S NEWSLETTER

( Delivery, twice-monthly, to your computer screen ! )

Issue # 106     July 15, 2007     Volume 5, Number 10
 
FROM THE EDITOR:  ( FLOYD MANN )
Temperatures right about 100 for weeks on end, no rain for a month, 5 major fires raging in Utah.  I think I just wrote the new state motto for Utah !  So hot HERE that the fire hydrants are learning how to whistle---so they can attract the dog's attention ! 
SAN SABA MINES SHOOTOUT
 
JOHNNIE NEVADA
 
BURIED TREASURE
 
SHIPWRECKS OF FLORIDA
 
RED RIVER BANDIT GOLD
 
DUTCH OVEN MINE
 
ANCIENT AMERICAN MAGAZINE
 
THE HATTON FERRY
 
THE EQUINOX PROJECT
 
TREASURE STORIES
 
ARKANSAS HIDDEN GOLD
 
THE LOST TREASURE OF ISSYK-KUL
 
FERRY CROSSINGS
 
THE GHOST GALLEON
 
OTTER CREEK, OK. GOLD
 
LOOT FROM THE WHYDAH
 
 
A CALIFORNIA STORY
 
A WISCONSIN STORY
 
EMPEROR'S CHAMBER OF SECRETS
 
RISE IN COPPER PRICES
 
SIX MONTHS IN THE GOLD MINES
 
$2,000 GOLD ?
Submitted by DANNY DUKE ( Texas )
 
BOWIE, TEXAS 1894
 
BOOM TIMES FOR URANIUM MINES
Submitted by EDDIE KRIENKE ( Utah )
 
SALVAGING SUNKEN TREASURE ON A BUDGET
Submitted by BETTY DUKE  ( Texas )
 
HOT ON THE TRAIL OF TREASURE IN VERO BEACH
Submitted by HERB KEISTER ( Utah )
 
CRYSTAL SKULLS
Submitted by HERB KEISTER ( Utah )
 
BEST PLACES TO HIDE VALUABLES
Submitted by HARLEY BISSELL ( Indiana )
 
LOVE OF CAP GUNS LEADS TO $2 MILLION COLLECTION
Submitted by HARLEY BISSELL ( Indiana )
 
EDITOR'S NOTE:   The next 4 articles were submitted by JEFF SORENSON ( MINNESOTA )
 
LOST TREASURE IN COLORADO
 
LOST GOLD & BURIED LOOT
 
THE CIVIL WAR HOME PAGE
 
TREASURE MOUNTAIN
 
FARMER DAN'S FORTUNE
 
FUN STUFF !
 
 
TWO SHACKS FOR SALE

BLM--STAKING A MINING CLAIM

General Mining Law of 1872
The federal law governing locatable minerals is the General Mining Law of 1872 (May 10, 1872), which declared all valuable mineral deposits in land belonging to the United States to be free and open to exploration and purchase.

This law provides citizens of the United States the opportunity to explore for, discover, and purchase certain valuable mineral deposits on public domain minerals.

Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA)
This Act did not amend the 1872 law, but did affect the recordation and maintenance of claims. Persons holding existing claims were required to record their claims with BLM by October 1979, and all new claims were required to be recorded with BLM. FLPMA’s purpose was to provide BLM with information on the locations and number of unpatented mining claims, mill sites, and tunnel sites to determine the na mes and addresses of current owners, and to remove any cloud of title on abandoned claims.

What is a Mining Claim?
A mining claim is a parcel of land for which the claimant has asserted a right of possession and the right to develop and extract a discovered, valuable, mineral deposit. This right does not include exclusive surface rights (see Public Law 84-167).

Locatable minerals include both metallic minerals (gold, silver, lead, etc.) and nonmetallic minerals (fluorspar, asbestos, mica, etc.). It is nearly impossible to list all locatable minerals because of the complex legal requirements for discovery.

 

Where Can a Claim be Located?


 

There are Federally administered land in 19 states where you may locate a mining claim or site. These states are Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. In these states, the BLM manages the surface of public land and the Forest Service manages the surface of National Forest System (NFS) land. The BLM is responsible for the subsurface on both public and NFS land.

Only public domain minerals are locatable minerals (those minerals that have never left federal ownership). Reconveyed minerals are considered public domain minerals under the mining laws. Mining claims cannot be staked on acquired minerals; a prospecting permit (43 CFR 3500) is required to prospect for acquired minerals. Mining claims can be located on open public land administered by another federal agency (most commonly on Forest Service land).

You may prospect and locate claims and sites on public and NFS land open to mineral entry. Claims may not be located in areas closed to mineral entry by a special act of Cong! ress, re gulation, or public land order. These areas are said to be "withdrawn" from mineral entry.

Areas withdrawn from location of mining claims include:

  • National Parks,
  • National Monuments,
  • Indian reservations,
  • most reclamation projects under the Bureau of Reclamation,
  • military reservations,
  • scientific testing areas,
  • most wildlife protection areas managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service etc.

Land withdrawn for power development may be subject to mining entry and claim location only under certain conditions.

Mining claims may not be located on land that has been:

  • designated by Congress as part of the National Wilderness Preservation System,
  • designated as a wild portion of a Wild and Scenic River, or
  • withdrawn by Congress for study as a Wild and Scenic River.

There is usually a ¼-mile buffer zone withdrawn from location of mining claims on either side of a river while the river is being studied for inclusion in the Wild and Scenic River System. Additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System are withdrawn to mining claim location at the time of designation by Congress. Mining activities are permitted only on those mining claims that can show proof of discovery either (1) by December 31, 1983, or (2) on the date of designation as wilderness by Congress.

Mining claims can be located on those minerals reserved under the Stock Raising Homestead Act of 1916 (SRHA). The surface is fee, but the minerals are public domain. There are specific regulations governing the claiming of SRHA minerals - refer to the SRHA section.

 

Typ! es of Cl aims


 

Two Types of Mining Claims:

  • Lode Claims - Deposits subject to lode claims include classic veins or lodes having well-defined boundaries. They also include other rock in-place bearing valuable minerals and may be broad zones of mineralized rock. Examples include quartz or other veins bearing gold or other metallic minerals and large volume, but low-grade disseminated gold deposits. Descriptions are by metes and bounds surveys beginning at the discovery point on the claim and including a reference to natural objects or permanent monuments. Federal statute limits their size to a maximum of 1500 feet in length, and a maximum width of 600 feet (300 feet on either side of the vein).
  • Placer Claims - Placer claims are defined as "...including all forms of deposit, excepting veins of quartz, or other rock in-place." In other words every deposit, not located with a lode claim, should be appropriated by a placer location. Placer claims, where practicable, are located by legal subdivision (aliquot part and complete lots). The maximum size is 20 acres per locator, and the maximum for an association placer is 160 acres for 8 or more locators. The maximum size in Alaska is 40 acres. The maximum size for a corporation is 20 acres per claim. Corporations may not locate association placers unless they are in association with other locators or corporations as co-locators.

Two Other Types of Mineral Entries:

  • Mill Sites - A mill site must be located on "nonmineral land" and must be noncontiguous to the lode or placer with which it is associated. Its purpose is to support a lode or placer mining operation. A mill site must include the erection of a mill or reduction works and/or may include other uses in support of a mining operation. Descriptions are by metes and bounds if on unsurveyed land and by legal subdivision if on surveyed land (described the same as placer claims). The maximum size! is 5 ac res.
  • Tunnel Sites - A tunnel site is a subsurface right-of-way under Federal land open to mineral entry. It is used for access to lode mining claims or to explore for blind or undiscovered veins, lodes, or ledges not currently claimed or known to exist on the surface. A tunnel site can be up to 3,000 feet in length.

Who Can Stake a Claim?


 

United States citizens who have reached the age of discretion, under the law of the state of residence; or legal immigrants who have declared their intention to become a citizen; or a corporation organized under the laws of any state may locate a mining claim. The government considers a corporation the same as a U.S. citizen.

An agent may locate a mining claim on behalf of a claimant.

A claimant may hold any number of claims or sites.

 

Recording a Mining Claim


 

To record your mining claim, file with the BLM State Office:

  • a copy of the Notice of Location or Location Certificate (which was or will be filed with the respective County Recorder),
  • a map or narrative showing the location of the claim,
  • and a filing fee of $170 per claim to the appropriate BLM office

    If the Location Notice or Location Certificate is not received or postmarked within the 90-day filing period, the Notice or Certificate will not be accepted and will be returned to you without further action.

    BLM does not require the claim information to be on any specific form, nor does BLM produce or distribute a form for such purpose. Local printing companies or stationery stores are typical sources for forms.

    The form submitted to BLM must include:

    • Date of location
    • Name and address o! f the ow ner(s)
    • Name of the claim/site
    • Type of claim/site
    • The acreage claimed
    • A description of the parcel on the ground (township, range, section, quarter section, and/or a metes and bounds description)

    A location map is required, if the legal description given can not be plotted onto a Master Title Plat.

    Recordation fees for new claims:

    • Location Fee = $30.00/claim
    • Maintenance Fee = $125.00/claim
    • Service Charge = $15.00/claim

    All monies are due at the time of filing. (A claim will not be accepted unless the payment of the maintenance and locations fees is submitted; the service charge portion is a curable defect.)

    The initial $125 maintenance fee is due for the assessment year in which the claim is located (not recorded). This fee is not prorated.

    Upon meeting the filing requirements, each claim is assigned a serial number. After adjudication of the filing has been completed, the claimant will receive notification from BLM acknowledging the claim and its assigned serial number.

    If a claimant requests a copy of the date stamped certificates of location, cost recovery fees apply (.13 per page).

 

For more information or to find the requirements for your state, please visit the Bureau of Land Management website .

Recommended Reading

Modern Pro! specting

Land in California

Stake Your Claim

Mining Claim Procedures  

Kim
Treasure Trips 

245 Meadow Creek Way
Queen Creek, Az 85242
United States
SPAIN SEIZES ODYSSEY BOAT
 
 
NEW SEARCH BEGINS IN EARHART MYSTERY
THE SECRET ARCHITECTURE OF WASHINGTON, D.C.
 
5,000 YEAR OLD TREASURE
 
HOW INTERNATIONAL BANKERS GAINED CONTROL OF AMERICA
A 3 hour, 35 minute video:
 
THE MONEY MASTERS
Two more videos:
 
INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY !!
Please email me ( Floyd Mann ) directly at FRMPINK@AOL.COM if you want to learn more details on investing in any of our TEAM's future treasure-hunting projects---we have over 50 projects to work on in the next 5 years !  LOTS of "potential" !!
 
FREE RESEARCH HELP
Have YOU got a project you could use some help on ?  Email me at:  FRMPINK@AOL.COM
 
CONCLUSION
It is going to be a BUSY Summer, Fall, Winter & 2008 !  LOTS of future trips to look for & FIND treasure !  Exciting adventures are right around the corner !
 
DEDICATION
As ALWAYS ( & Forever ! ) to my wife:  TARA !!
 

COPYRIGHT :   This LOST TREASURE USA newsletter, and my website at www.LostTreasureUSA.com   are copyrighted 2003-2007 by FLOYD MANN ( D.B.A. Lost Treasure USA ).  But, you may ( please ! ) forward it to as many people as you like.

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